Lincoln Injury Blog

Building your case for benefits after a construction site injury

Construction workers in Lincoln have one of the most dangerous jobs in the state. These workers are put into a countless number of dangerous situations each day. Most of the time construction workers are able to stay safe, but occasionally there are construction worker injuries.

According to OSHA, over 4,300 people are killed in construction site injuries each year in the United States. There are many ways in which a person can be killed in construction. Common ways include electrocution, scaffolding injuries, falling debris, falling ladders, swinging equipment, heavy equipment accidents, among countless others. Construction workers have a very physical job that lends itself to injury. When a construction worker is injured, their entire livelihood may be at stake and they may not be able to return to work again.

Those who are injured on the job are entitled to workers compensation. But, navigating workers compensation rules and procedures may be tricky. Our law firm has been helping injured construction site workers get the compensation they deserve. We understand the complexities a workers' compensation case can bring and know how to work with multiple parties, general contractors, site owners, and sub- contractors. Our experience can ensure you receive excellent representation and advice regarding your injury and recovery. We want our client's lives to return to normal as quickly as possible and we work hard to make sure that happens.

When your livelihood is at stake it is important you don't leave it up to chance. Contacting our law firm to help with your workers compensation claim is a smart idea that can ensure you get the help you need and deserve.

Protecting injured workers, accident victims and their families in Lincoln, Nebraska and across the U.S.

Contact Our Firm Today

Schedule a meeting with Mr. Linscott by calling 402-477-4357 or by filling out the form below.

Initial consultations are free and representation is handled on a contingency basis.